Friday, November 17, 2017

RADICAL POSSIBILITIES: YOUR CHILDREN!



So, who is Dr. Barbara Cooper and why should you care that she is the CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER OF ALABAMA SCHOOLS?

Dr. Barbara Cooper was hired by then Supt Michael Sentance to be the Chief Academic Officer of Alabama schools. In August of 2017 then Supt. Michael Sentance was on Reggie Eggleston’s show on WXVI with Dr. Barbara  Cooper, his Chief Academic Officer.  Dr. Cooper said that her “bible” for education policy is Radical Possibilities by Jean Anyon. 

Dr. Cooper is obviously proud of her education policy. So why should you be concerned? 

Radical Possibilities is reviewed by Pat Ellis below.


But, you live in Florida. Just why should you care? The same philosophy undergirds Common Core and ALL that IS IN YOUR SCHOOLS!

You do not realize how insidiously this radical agenda has been inserted into our schools. I became aware of it while battling for the right for children to have effective reading instruction. In the early 1990s, years before my husband and I retired to Florida, I actually read the Whole Language Catalog. A group of parents had invited a principal who used a Phonics Intensive Reading program to address our School Board. Dr. Patricia Fritchie, the head of Troy State University Dothan’s Reading program, vehemently led the opposition at a Dothan, Alabama school board meeting along with her proselytes in the school system. The event became a Whole Language Hootenanny.




In reading Pat Ellis’ review, I stumbled across the name of someone quite familiar to me from having read the Whole Language Catalog (Kenneth S. Goodman, Lois Bridges Bird and Yetta Goodman), the manifesto of the Progressive Education Movement. Michael Apple appeared in the viewpoint section with an article, Teachers, Politics and Whole Language Instruction. Please notice that Michael Apple writes the introduction to Radical Possibilities. This excerpt from the WL Catalog will alert you as to his philosophy on education. 



...And there are reasons for the current emphasis on an educationally and politically return to a curriculum based on the "western tradition" and "cultural literacy."

...Its proponents need to join with others in the wider social movements that aim at democratizing our economy, politics, and culture, and that act against a society that is so unequal in gender, race, and class terms.

"This does not mean that action in schools is unimportant. However, there are socio-cultural pre-conditions for long term success in transforming education into something worthy of its name. And unless this is understood fully, the whole language movement may unfortunately remain isolated on the margins of "ordinary" educational activity. Or, perhaps even worse, small parts of it will be incorporated into classrooms in "safe" and very limited ways, thereby transforming it into one more set of techniques in the right's reconstruction of education (Wilinsky, 1990). We cannot afford to let that happen. The daily lives and futures of real students and teachers are at stake."


The Whole Language Movement was indeed the Progressive Left insertion into the basics of American Education. Those delicate roots that should have been extracted then with the Outcome Based Education Movement have taken root with full blown Common Core. This curriculum should be called Rotten to the Core. These people have told us their intent in the Whole Language Catalog and here in Radical Possibilities. 

They boast about it on the radio. And yet, we refuse to believe it is happening in our schools and to our children!

So now meet Dr. Barbara Cooper.


Dr. Barbara Cooper was hired by then Supt Michael Sentence to be the Chief Academic Officer of Alabama schools. 



She said in a radio interview this year in Montgomery that the book, Radical Possibilities by Jean Anyon is her guidebook and reflects her education philosophy.  It is reviewed by Pat Ellis below.

RADICAL POSSIBILITIES
BY Jean Anyon
Published 2005
In reviewing Radical Possibilities, I noted that Ms. Anyon thoroughly referenced all of her sources. I did not research these sources to determine if they were credible, factual or biased.

In her Introduction Ms. Anyon gives us a short biography of the person she is, her education and the experiences that formed her opinions on education. She believes “what should count as education policy would include strategies to increase the minimum wage, invest in urban job creation and training, provide funds for college completion to those who cannot afford it, and enforce laws that would end racial segregation in housing and hiring.” She makes a case for the aforementioned throughout her book.

Professor Michael Apple introduces Radical Possibilities. As part of his commentary he presents himself as a kindred spirit of Ms. Anyon’s. He states: “The two of us share a sense of profound anger at the ways in which not only schools, but nearly all of this society’s major institutions are organized to maintain massive inequalities. And like so many others who share this anger, we want to participate in struggles to alter these conditions.”

Chapter 1 - The Economic is Political

According to Ms. Anyon, poverty in U.S. families is more widespread than believed and is catastrophic in families of color. Low school funding levels and federal policies maintain poverty. Low wages are an important part of poverty. Low wage workers are those whose hourly wage is less than the earnings necessary to lift a family above the official poverty line.

It is a myth promoted by politicians, educators and corporate spokespeople that the U.S. must improve education because people need advanced skills to get  job. “Most job openings in the next ten years will not require either sophisticated skills or a college degree.” “Managerial and professional occupations will also need more workers, but their numbers pale compared with openings requiring less education. Indeed, a typical job of the future is retail sales at Wal-Mart.”
In this chapter Ms. Anyon includes a multitude of statics on jobs and lack of job growth in minority communities.  She makes the case to increase the minimum wage because these are the types of jobs that will be plentiful. She also argues that corporations are disingenuous claiming there is a shortage of Americans with computer skills so that these corporations can go overseas and pay lower wages.

Chapter 2 – Federal Policies Maintain Urban Poverty

Economic policies yield widespread low wage work even among an increasingly educated workforce. This premise strains the credibility of urban school reform as a solution to problems of the urban poor.

(Page 2)

Some federal policies that contribute to widespread poverty wage-work are:
1. Anti-unionization laws.
2. Federal job training without job creation.
3. Class biased regulations of the Federal Reserve Bank.
4. Free trade Agreements.
5. Minimum wage.

Quoting Gordon Lafer, Ms. Anyon states union organizing: “for non-college education workers unionization can be much more important than further education. For non-union high school dropouts monetary advantage of finishing school is an increase of $2.25 per hour, while organizing one’s workforce will benefit the worker more than twice as much. Similarly, high school graduates contemplating getting some college training short of a bachelors would actually do three times better to organize than go back to school.”

For students who don’t have funds for college, rather than pursue higher education should perhaps become involved in the political contention necessary to organize a union at their place of work.
Ms. Anyon asks if education can be used as a remedy for poverty and low-wage work or must we change federal policies in order to solve the problem? Her answer is education is important, but plays less of a role than we assume. Education explains only about a third of income levels.  Another piece of the puzzle is lack of federal and state policies and discrimination on the basis of race.

There are two lessons regarding education and income:
1. For many students, economic policy may trump educational attainment.
2. We cannot expect education to compensate for inequalities wrought by macroeconomics policy.
Policies we need:
1. Maintain low interest rates.
2. Increase government spending on infrastructure and human capital development, and creating demand side pressure – a need for workers.
3. Reinstate wage and price guidelines.
4. Creation of jobs by the federal government for those who need and want them.
5. Passage of higher minimum wage laws, health insurance and other benefits.
6. Eliminate regressive taxes.
7. Protect union organizing
8. Institute worker protection laws for employees of small businesses.

Black and Latino Workers

1. There is discrimination in hiring because of soft skills (interaction, language use, grooming, attire, positive work attitude, dependable, etc.). “Managers in various economic sectors expressed increased demands for soft skills more frequently than for any hard skill but for computer literacy.”
2. High incarceration rates.
(Page 3)
3. Employers hesitant to hire workers with criminal record.
4. Policies that create jobs with federal  government as employer of last resort.
5. Nearly 2/3 of nation’s prisoners are Black and Latino and in many states cannot receive welfare, student loans, live in public housing or vote.
“Educators who care deeply about these students must come to grips with the fact that no amount of school reform as presently conceived will make the economy accept minority high school graduates in a more humane manner.”

Chapter 3 – Taxing Rich and Poor
Rules set by Congress protect wealth and extremes of inequality that characterize the United States.
1. Regressive payroll tax and state taxes.
2. Inequality of income directly related to U.S. tax regulations.
3. Low taxes charged to those with high incomes.
4. Unethical but legal tax dodges for wealthy.
5. Laws that allow corporations with billions pay little or no taxes.

Most egregious aspect of corporate tax situation: 60% of largest most profitable corporations pay no income tax at all.

One viable source of income for services for poor is the vast untaxed income of very rich individuals and corporations. Some companies are highlighted as having paid no tax or very little.
In the rest of this chapter Ms. Anyon provided statistics on concentration of wealth in different sections of the United States from time of the colonies to the Late 1950’s. She included Robber Barons, Progressive Era and Roaring 20’s. She discussed income tax history and rates from 1861 through the Civil War, Great Depression, WW II and the Reagan Administration.

Corrective Policies:
1. Wealth Tax (similar to Swiss system).
2. Federal Reserve Board contributes significantly to inequality by high interest rates.
“There is one more type of federal policy that contributes significantly to inequality, and should be corrected: the elevation of a U.S. financial governing body that is not elected – the Federal Reserve Board.”

Chapter 4 – New Hope for Urban Students
There is direct and indirect evidence that an increase in family resources raises academic achievement. Improving family income reduces negative and aggressive social behavior of children and leads to better school behavior and performance.

(Page 4)

New Hope is a non-profit community based organization that provides:
1. Earnings supplement.
2. Subsidized health insurance
3. Subsidized child care.
4. Provides community service job for one year.

Outcome of these four provisions – children’s school performance improved.

Ms. Anyon goes into great detail in this chapter how income supports promote academic achievement and the value of programs like New Hope. She makes the case for equity-seeking educational reform. “The educational success of affluent districts demonstrates to me that economic strength is the engine of systemic school reform.”

Chapter 5 – Jobs and Public Transit Mismatches

This chapter addresses the issue that many jobs for minorities lie outside their residential area and travel is difficult or not worth the expense for the amount of dollar return in wages.

1. There need to be policies that would place jobs in urban communities.
2. Need to be transportation policies that establish bus and train routes from cities to outlying surburbs where entry level jobs exist.
3. Foundational education reforms could be due to regional jobs, transportation, housing and municipal tax reform.
4.  Demographics – Low income minorities are no longer concentrated in inner cities, but in various segregated fiscally stressed suburbs. These share characteristics of inner cities.
5. Exclusionary Zoning (state and local). Regulations regarding land lot size, etc. limit construction of affordable housing in suburbs preventing people needing entry level jobs from moving closer to those jobs.
6. Transportation – few low income city residents have cars or public transportation to travel for work
7. Difficulty networking for jobs in neighborhoods where there are few jobs and few employed residents.

Project Quest – This is a successful innovative job training program. It was founded through collaboration between community based organizations, businesses and educational institutions. Included are child care, transportation assistance,  medical care, tutoring and modest cash assistance for incidentals and tuition for community college. Project Quest is an important model for assisting low income residents.

Transportation – Without available transportation residents of low income neighborhoods cannot reach job centers.

One method of increasing number of jobs in depressed urban areas is to reconnect neighborhood economies to regional markets.

(Page 5)

The rest of this chapter provides examples of successful community based corporations that hire and train local residents.

Chapter 6 – Regional Housing Reform as Education Reform

The most egregious social phenomena is the housing concentration of low income students into central cities or urbanized suburban neighborhoods. This creates education segregation of urban Blacks and Latinos into schools where majority are poor.

Solution:
1. States should spread tax dollars from more affluent suburban schools to cities to increase education funding in those cities.
2. The federal government should provide more federal housing assistance.
The effects of residential segregation on schools are:
1. Insufficient school funding.
2. Few AP classes, if any.
3. Too few qualified teachers.
4. Undemanding pedagogy.
5. Low academic achievement.
6. Buildings in disrepair.
7. Students unprepared for technology due to few computers.
8. Large classes.

Housing Solutions:

1. Mobility programs that relocate urban families who want to move to less segregated and/or higher income areas.
2. Construction of more affordable housing. Example – Albuquerque, NM instituted a policy that integrates poor families into middle class neighborhoods and schools.
3. Gatraux Program in Chicago led to over 50 other mobility programs, including the “Moving to Opportunity” program begun by HUD in 1994. MOP was carried out in five cities: Baltimore, Boston,Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.

Fair Share Affordable Housing

While racial discrimination in housing is illegal, discrimination on basis of class is not. Private housing providers are generally free to discriminate against purchases or renters based on income. Class based exclusionary zoning is an area that needs policy and behavioral changes.

(Page 6)

Massachusetts Fair Share Housing Program is an example of distributing low income affordable housing in all cities of the state with middle class and more affluent. Equitable distribution of housing would deconcentrate poor students from central cities and low income suburbs.

Metro Area Finance Inequities
1. Federal funds to cities went primarily to income support and in suburbs to wealth creation.
2. Another financial inequity among municipalities in regions is racial segregation of low income minorities in cities and financially distressed suburbs. The more segregated an area the more unequal tax base.
Educational Finance Inequities
Federal and state policies, regional zoning and various gentlemen’s agreements that segregate low income families in fiscally stressed urban areas condemn them to underfunded education.

Policies to Correct:
1. Implement regional revenue sharing (Horizontal sharing between local governments is less prevalent and multi -jurisdictional is very rare.)
2. Since all taxpayers in a region pay taxes that subsidize development in affluent areas, all municipalities should share in taxes that accrue.

Social Movements and New Policies

Public contestation seems necessary if we are going to fulfill the redistributive potential of American democracy and U. S. education. “ Even the more recent passage of Empowerment Zone legislation to assist urban neighborhood economic development was approved in response to riots after the Rodney King beating in Los Angeles. “

Local Challenges to Federal & Regional Mandates

1. “Attempting to fix inner city schools without fixing the city is like cleaning the air on one side of a screen door.”
2. Organized public contestation is necessary to build a strong foundation in cities.
Federal Programs
1. Federal programs fail because they leave unaltered basic macroeconomic policies and regional arrangements that define the underlying rules maintaining poverty and scarcity.
(Page 7)
2. Although commercial downtowns in many cities have rebounded with the help of federal dollars, conditions in most urban neighborhoods have improved only slightly.
Philanthropic Foundations
1. “At worst, they fund discrete projects for a short amount of time dropping them to find the next flavor of the month.”
2. “At best, they fund comprehensive longer term programs with regional forces whose goal is to foster responsiveness in urban and rural government agencies.”

Community Development Corporations

“Ability of CDC’s to eliminate poverty in urban areas is not only delimited by federal and regional systems. Many CDC’s have become clients in their city’s patronage system of political spoils, and no longer challenge the basic rules of the game as they did in the 1960’s and 1970’s.”

Regional Campaigns and School Reform

“Building coalitions of groups across neighborhoods of a city, across inner city and segregated suburb and throughout metropolitan regions should become a priority. And these campaigns ought to be aimed at unjust metro area, state and federal barriers to effective urban school systems, as well as at school and class size, and pedagogy.”

Chapter 8 – How Do People Become Involved in Political Contention

“Economic justice, this important precursor of systemic urban school reform, will not be achieved without concerted, sustained political struggle. Although activism for economic opportunity is necessary, educational reform must be a target of sustained contention, as well.”

Attribution of Opportunity

“The first process I apply from Dynamics of Contention has to do with how people interpret changes in the political economy.” This type of change should encourage social protest and people should view developments as presenting opportunities.

“Indeed, it is sometimes necessary for social activists to decide they must create a crisis in order to force concessions from governing groups.” “The strategy of the civil rights campaign in Birmingham was to paralyze the city through massive direct action. The plan was to bring out enough demonstrators and create mass arrests that would fill the jails.” If there were enough demonstrators the social order could be changed and the movement would be successful.
______________________________________________________________________________

My addition below:
Please note here the method David Hornbeck, author of Goals 2000 A Plus "grassroots" "education reformation" in 1990s recommended in Human Capital. 


Court orders can be exceptionally good vehicles for creating a sufficient sense of crisis and an imperative to act so that supporting legislation can be enacted. 



Continuing with Pat Ellis' Revue....
 ____________________________________________________________________________


(Page 9)

Appropriation of Existing Organizations, Institutions and Cultural Forms

People should actively appropriate existing institutions and cause them to become more radical; change their mission and how they operate (thereby becoming useful for transgressive politics). Examples are Black churches in 50’s and 60’s. Churches saw their mission as a preparation for salvation. The churches were appropriated and became tools of the civil rights movement.

Creation of Regional Organizations

“Piven and Cloward contend that organizations weaken social movements, because political insurgency tends to be abandoned as groups build hierarchy and procedure, and cooperate with government bureaucracies in attempts to further the interest of their members.” Aldon Morris contests this theory stating without the SCLC, the civil rights movement might have failed.
The author discusses civil rights leaders and their accomplishments regarding mass mobilization.

Centrality of Youth

Ms. Anyon relates an argument by Bob Moses that we can’t count on adults because of lack of time or economic independence enjoyed by the white man. Consequently, young people must organize and be the agents of political and social change.  She hopes to appropriate the anger of youth to constructive political ends.

Community Organizing

One of the most important strategies of the civil rights movement was community organizing. Neutralizing Black middle class leaders was an important first step.

Social Construction of New Identities through Participation in Transgressive Politics

“To activate people to create or join a social movement, it is important to actually involve them in protest activity of some kind.” Participating in contention creates new politicized characteristics.

Appropriation of Threat

“Nonviolent civil disobedience was a process long used by Black activists.” The hope that staging a nonviolent protest would cause the oppressor to react violently and discredit himself. This is fundamental to the Ghandian concept.

(Page 10)

The Process of Legitimation

“Social movement theory and the history of political movements – in this case civil rights – provide a rich tapestry of possibility. Images of suffering, rebellion and victory grace the walls of the American past. If we are willing, we can appropriate this brocade, and design the future with it.”

Chapter 9 – Building a New Social Movement

In this chapter, Ms. Anton repeats information from previous chapters regarding the importance of a new social movement.

New social movement should:
1. Double the minimum wage.
2. Create decently paying jobs in cities.
3. Provide transportation to suburban jobs.
4. Tax great personal and corporate wealth to pay for this public investment and share proceeds with rich and poor municipalities across the U.S. metro areas.

We should mobilize underlying rage and channel that energy that is released for the new social movement.

Two existing social movements that have been successful are ACORN and IAF.
The IAF trains neighborhood residents and leaders in ten day institutes that help residents with skills of organizing, etc.

Attribution of Opportunity

“Urban-suburban coalitions of distressed, segregated school districts could force the issue of equitable funding in metro areas and the many states that have had legal challenges to the constitutionality of existing school finance.”

Ms. Anton goes onto discuss technological developments to mobilize urban communities. She mentions actions and success of Moveon.org.

Outsiders and Cultural Brokers

Residents of urban neighborhoods, adults and youth, should not be expected to organize a movement on their own. There are sympathetic citizens that are bicultural, bi-class brokers that should take advantage of their relatively privileged position to provide opportunities and encourage urban residents

(Page 11)

to explain their grievances and articulate a strategy and – most important – to engage in contentions politics.

Appropriation of Social Networks

If the 7.5 million grassroots organizations and the several thousand Community Development Corporations were working together toward a common goal they would constitute a vast national network that would be significant in a social movement.

In this section, Ms. Anyon also discusses differences in generations and the importance of bridging the gap for the sake of movement building.  She further states there is “little agreement between members of old and young in the African American community today”. The generations are even suspicious of one another. She also mentions the history of African American churches supporting social justice mobilizing. She brings up that point that these same churches currently are not as concerned about “social uplift”.

Chapter 10 – Putting Education at the Center

In this last chapter, Ms. Anyon repeats some of her thoughts. She also mentions Bill Gates Foundation and the Soros Foundation and the dollars they donated to create new small schools for inner city students in New York. Another organization, Pacific Institute for Community Organizing, is a national network of community based organizations. Ms. Anyon stated the organization facilitates exchanges between networks of school reformers and organizers.

Acquiring Community Organizing Skills

Ms. Anyon provides six suggestions for organizing parents in extended issue campaigns. Following is a short synopsis:

1. Choose issues from the bottom up. Issues should come from parents, students and other residents.
2. Begin to build a community constituency for long range reform.
3. Locate key school and district personnel who can assist with problems you want to address.
4. Develop a program of needed changes and present it to authorities. Plan demonstrations an other activities.
5. Develop a plan for what to do when people in power ignore you, etc.
6. Keep pressure on administrations and officials by demonstrations and actions of various sorts.

Classrooms as Movement Building Spaces

In this section, Ms. Anton promotes strategies for teachers to engage their students in civic activism and provides examples from the Philadelphia School System.

(Page 12)

Mapping Community Assets

Mapping community assets is an activity to engage students in researching their neighborhoods for community resources that could be useful to make the neighborhood a better place to live and work. Included in the assets would be the “gifts, skills and capacities of the community’s residents”.
Power Analysis

“A power analysis identifies a problem faced by students or other community residents and asks the following kinds of questions:

1. Who is impacted by the problem?
2. Who makes the decisions that affect the immediate situation?
3. Who makes the decisions that determine what those individuals or groups do and say?
4. What kind of informal influence or formal power do they have?
5. What kinds of informal influence or formal power do community residents have over the situation?
6. Whose interests are affected by decisions that have been made?
7. Who are potential allies in an attempt to solve the problem.

Developing an Issue Campaign

“One key to developing an issue campaign with students is to break the overall task – say, a campaign for immigrant students’ rights into manageable pieces…”

When working with youth use their own cultural modes. Example: “…a youth organizer in Oakland, CA took a group of her students to a concert by the Hip Hop group Dead Prez, a politically progressive group.” She reported: “Attending the concert was an incredible political education for the students because they related so well to the medium in which the political message was delivered.”
This section goes on to list the steps to take in order to have a successful campaign when working with young people on issues. One suggestion is to have teachers and students work together and protest together. An anecdotal protest in Chicago had students and teachers both taking part targeting the board of education. They protested the U.S. military budget supporting the war in Iraq and depleting money available for public education. (A write-up of the “Rally” is on Page 195, Radical Possibilities)

“Long ago, community organizing icon Saul Alinsky pioneered the use of conventions to establish unified agendas and strategies among groups (Shaw 2001, p. 258) and such an approach seems crucial to the creation of synergy and impact today.”


_______________________________________________________________________________
My addition so you know what Anyone is talking about. Sharman Ramsey





















Then continuing with Pat Ellis' revue........
_________________________________________________________________________________

Conclusion

In closing, Ms. Anyon states: “This reorientation of education policy is unabashedly radical and brings me to a final point. Whether one is born to radicalism or acquires it along the way, the premises on

(Page 13)

which it rests affirm the deeply rooted connections and disjunctures between democracy and capitalism.”

“Public policies regarding economic and social equity ought to be among the strategies we propose in our attempt to increase urban school quality.”

Radical Possibilities
Reviewed by:
Pat Ellis
October 4, 2017
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____________________________________________________________________________

My addition below. Sharman Ramsey



 WHAT IS EQUITY? Leveling to make sure everyone has the same. Equity and Freedom cannot co-exist. A mountain must be leveled to make a valley equal and so in education must excellence be leveled to make all the same.

Hasn’t this been tried before? Pictured above the Title of this page is Antonio Gramsci: Intellectual and politician, a founder of the Italian Communist Party whose ideas greatly influenced Italian communism.  And then we have Russia under Stalin. Only Communism/Socialism didn’t work. The enforcers of this philosophy eliminated challengers. With no incentive to excel, the people starved.

Ayn Rand









Education


Parents have rights Against Intrusive Surveys PROTECTION OF PUPIL RIGHTS AMENDMENT and SEL (Social Emotional Learning)



If I Ruled the Schools

FREE OUR CHILDREN FROM THE OPPRESSION OF COLLEGES OF EDUCATION. CHICAGO. TWO DIFFERENT PHILOSOPHIES.  

Common Core, Sylvia Plath, and Death Education
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/12/common-core-sylvia-plath-and-death.html

Tales from the Crypt. True stories of our Dead Schools. 

The Truth about Phonics that will Help You Help Your Child! Whole Language: A Fraud Perpetrated upon Our Students. One of Many?

The Tragedy of the Math Mess and Another Way

MATH WARS. ONCE AGAIN INTO THE FRAY

COMMON CORE MATH

The Reality of Bay District Schools. Only Fifty Percent Read Proficiently. Is there hope?

The Four Period Day: Students as Guinea Pigs and Professional advancement for "innovators"

The Tale of Last Hope for Local Control

DEMONIC ROOTS TO COMMON CORE? VISIT YOUR CHILD'S THERAPEUTIC CLASSROOM.

THE GENEALOGY OF COMMON CORE: BILL GATES/UNESCO/ROBERT MULLER//ALICE BAILEY/LUCIS TRUST 

THE CHICAGO CONNECTION TO COMMON CORE

does anybody really believe anymore? does anybody really care?https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/12/does-anybody-really-believe-anymore.html

Sounding the Alarm! Today's Therapeutic Classroom. What are you going to do about it?

Spalding Writing Road to Reading and John Winston of Parks Elementary Natchitoches, Louisiana
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/12/spalding-writing-road-to-reading-and.html

RETARDING AMERICA THE IMPRISONMENT OF POTENTIAL

NOTE FROM ROBERT SWEET OF THE NATIONAL RIGHT TO READ FOUNDATION

The DARE PROGRAM 20 years later.
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/12/the-dare-program-20-years-later-more.html

Merry Christmas! Meet Alliwishus, The Elf Mother Met at the Battle of the Bulge

My Mother. My hero who won a Battle Ribbon at the Battle of the Bulge. December 16, 1944. A SCRAPBOOK LOOK FROM JEAN BRONSON GILLIS BURSON.

LEONARD COHEN HALLELUJAH PROJECT AT BAY HIGH SCHOOL AND ESTABLISHMENT RELIGION, SECULAR HUMANISM, IN OUR SCHOOLS
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/12/leonard-cohen-hallelujah-project-at-bay.html

WHY SHOULD CONSERVATIVES, CHRISTIANS AND THE THE FAITH COMMUNITY BE CONCERNED ABOUT THIS? SUBSCRIBE TO THE PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD AND GET WASHINGTON POST FREE

PEACE EDUCATION? CONFLICT RESOLUTION? TEACHING TOLERANCE? COMMON CORE 

TRADITIONAL OR PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION. DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE? HAS POLITICS AFFECTED YOUR CHILD'S MATH EDUCATION?


RETARDING AMERICA THE IMPRISONMENT OF POTENTIAL

NOTE FROM ROBERT SWEET OF THE NATIONAL RIGHT TO READ FOUNDATION
DELPHI TECHNIQUE, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE EDUCATION ESTABLISHMENT CONVINCED A GULLIBLE PUBLIC TO BUY INTO COMMON CORE

COMMON CORE: PORNOGRAPHY 101

MIDDLE SCHOOL AGENDA FOR SEXUAL ORIENTATION AS A PART OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

BEHAVIOR MODELS ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS

CULTURE WAR AND COMMON CORE

SOCIAL STUDIES AND COMMON CORE

TEACHERS AS LIBERATORS PRODUCE STUDENTS AS REVOLUTIONARIES: Whole Language Live On!

RADICAL POSSIBILITIES: YOUR CHILDREN 
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/11/radical-possibilities-your-children.html

Response to AL.Com article "Alabama Superintendent Proposal to Raise Academic Standards."
SECULAR HUMANISM IS NOW THE RELIGION OF OUR SCHOOLS

COMMON CORE: THE EMPEROR IS WEARING NO CLOTHES

COMMON CORE=PETRI DISH FOR RADICALS
https://sharmanbursonramsey.blogspot.com/2017/11/common-core-petri-dish-for-radicals.html

REVOLUTIONARY PEDAGOGY

Revolutionary Pedagogy: Or, so you thought reading, writing and calculating were why you sent your child to school?
EDUCATION TODAY:

Politics, Profits, Position, Power, and Prejudice published 1995

CAPSTONE EDUCATION (UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA) AND MY CONCERNS

CONFLICT RESOLUTION OR POLITICAL INDOCTRINATION?

DELPHI TECHNIQUE, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, AND THE EDUCATION ESTABLISHMENT CONVINCED THE GULLIBLE NATION TO BUY INTO COMMON CORE

WHO DO WE HOLD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THE FAILURE OF OUR SCHOOLS?

PUBLIC EDUCATION SHOULD EMPOWER PARENTS

CONSPIRACY THEORIES IN EDUCATION

THE CIVIL WAR IN EDUCATION 

SOLVE THE PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS

TAKE A KNEE

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